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  1. #1
    Elite Mythos's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Lifting heavier still = stronger

    This little 2017 study is basically saying that it's neural adaptations that make you stronger when you exercise with heavier weights (not muscle hypertrophy which is similar to lifting with lighter weight). By weight i mean % of 1 rep max.

    Edit: I really didn't phrase this right. What i mean is that despite the same amount of hypertrophy as equivalent output with lower weights, lifting heavier has an advantage in strength gain due to the neural benefits.

    http://journal.frontiersin.org/artic...017.00331/full



    The neuromuscular system displays a high degree of adaptability and responds to resistance training in a manner that ultimately results in enhanced force or torque production. The specific neuromuscular adaptations responsible for the increase in muscle strength are often broadly grouped as morphological and neural (Folland and Williams, 2007). Several morphological adaptations to resistance training have been identified (Staron et al., 1994; Aagaard et al., 2001; Williamson et al., 2001; Seynnes et al., 2007), the primary and most widely-studied of which is skeletal muscle hypertrophy (Folland and Williams, 2007). It is thought that resistance training also elicits small adaptive changes at multiple sites within the nervous system that, together, enhance muscle strength (Sale, 1988; Gabriel et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2009). One of the primary proposed adaptations is an increase in the ability to maximally excite the motor neuron pool (i.e., agonist activation), which may be secondary to an increase in descending excitatory drive, a decrease in inhibition, and/or an increase in facilitatory mechanisms
    .

    Six weeks of high- (80% 1RM) and low-load (30% 1RM) resistance training to failure elicited equivalent hypertrophy as measured by ultrasound. However, training at 80% 1RM induced greater strength gains, which has been demonstrated repeatedly (Campos et al., 2002; Mitchell et al., 2012; Ogasawara et al., 2013; Schoenfeld et al., 2015; Jenkins et al., 2016). The unique contributions of this study were the robust measurements (VA and EMGQAMP during maximal and submaximal torque levels) used to elucidate any potential underlying neural factors. Indeed, greater neural adaptations were observed after resistance training at 80% 1RM compared to the 30% 1RM group. Specifically, our data during maximal torque levels suggests that, after 6 weeks of training, 80% 1RM loads elicit greater increases in neural drive than 30% 1RM loads, while our data during submaximal torque levels suggests that resistance training at 80% 1RM increases the efficiency of muscle activation to a greater extent than 30% 1RM training.
    Last edited by Mythos; 07-10-2017 at 10:06 PM. Reason: I made a word salad

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  3. #2
    Elite Milo's Avatar
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    Not entirely new. Most know that the reason for a "peak" phase is to develop the CNS not the muscle. Its taking the muscle built in the strength and hypertrophy phase and building those neural adaptations to move the weight. I will try to find the study, but somewhere I read that training in singles, doubles, or triples will preserve muscle size and strength but eventually result in a decrease in both if volume isn't reintroduced. I believe this is why good routines such as Conjugate emphasize repetition work after your ME or DE.
    Last edited by Milo; 07-10-2017 at 09:27 PM.
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  5. #3
    Elite Mythos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    Not entirely new. Most know that the reason for a "peak" phase is to develop the CNS not the muscle. Its taking the muscle built in the strength and hypertrophy phase and building those neural adaptations to move the weight. I will try to find the study, but somewhere I read that training in singles, doubles, or triples will preserve muscle size and strength but eventually result in a decrease in both if volume isn't reintroduced.
    Yeah, i used to think this was common knowledge but Ive been seeing some people making the argument that because of all the studies pointing towards hypertrophy being the same at lower weight there's no benefit to lifting at a higher % of 1RP.
    I hope you can find that article! I wonder if they had any theories as to why that is..

  6. #4
    Administrator PillarofBalance's Avatar
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    So muscle confusion?

    I think the takeaway from such research should basically scream to you - vary your training intensities and track strength over time.
    Rest in Peace Robot Lord. First round of Natty Boh is on me when I make it up there with you brother.

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  8. #5
    Elite trodizzle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PillarofBalance View Post
    So muscle confusion?

    I think the takeaway from such research should basically scream to you - vary your training intensities and track strength over time.
    Disclaimer: I am not a licensed expert so the views expressed in this post should be considered, like, my personal opinion man.

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    Elite BigSwolePump's Avatar
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    I don't know all the fancy science behind this but I know that once you reach a certain poundage, there is a big difference in how you train in terms of power. I used those bench press calculators for 1RM before while training high reps and it was off by at least 80lbs. I think that you have to get used to lifting heavy in order to be able to move heavy weight. I also think that the older I get, the more heavy weight is painful lol
    Don't listen to me. I make things up as I go.

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  12. #7
    Elite BRICKS's Avatar
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    "the older I get, the more heavy weight is painful"

    I have found this to definitely be true in my case, BSP Joints just don't like super heavy weights the next day.


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