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Thread: MATADOR study

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    MATADOR study

    This one is a couple of years old now but it’s pretty unique so I wanted to share it with you guys. Basically, it compares continuous caloric restriction to intermittent caloric restriction (2 week on/off cycle).
    Both groups had 16 weeks total time in restriction.
    Intermittent group lost 5 more pounds total, all fat free mass.
    More interesting, the reduction in REE (resting energy expenditure) was doubled for the continuous dieters. A big impact on what’s commonly called “metabolism”.
    Based on previous studies examining the adaptive metabolic decreases from extended dieting, the intermittent approach completely eliminated so-called “adaptive thermogenesis” so that the reduction in REE was exactly what would be expected simply by the amount of fat mass lost, no adaptation had taken place in this group. The intermittent dieters also managed to keep the weight off much longer than the continuous group. Worth a read if you’ve got the time:
    Available for free on nature dot com. (Still can’t post links

    Article title: Intermittent energy restriction improves weight loss efficiency in obese men: the MATADOR study


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    I've heard many talk about this study, and it's very interesting and brings up several further questions.

    The most common I hear is how a 16 week vs a 32 total week time frame affects the psychology of the dieter. Basically get in, diet, and get out vs a long drawn out process.

    It'd be cool to see other studies try this experiment with other time models, like 3 on 1 off, 4 on 2 off, 5 on 1 off, etc... to see the outcomes, and hear how people responded both mentally and physically to them.

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    Just want to make a few corrections to the original post.

    intermittent group lost 5 KILOS more, so closer to 11 pounds and it was mostly fat mass lost, not fat free mass.

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    Originally Posted by CJ275 View Post
    I've heard many talk about this study, and it's very interesting and brings up several further questions.
    The most common I hear is how a 16 week vs a 32 total week time frame affects the psychology of the dieter. Basically get in, diet, and get out vs a long drawn out process.
    Absolutely, the time period has to be a disincentive. However, the rate of weight regain is a major factor in people giving up dieting entirely so that's kind of a 2-edged sword. Unfortunately, what most overweight/obese folks need is to learn to always watch what they eat. In the intermittent plan, most would still need to watched their diets on the "off" weeks as many eat far more than their daily maintenance needs multiple days/week. That discipline probably contributed somewhat to the groups ability to keep the weight off.

    Originally Posted by CJ275 View Post
    It'd be cool to see other studies try this experiment with other time models, like 3 on 1 off, 4 on 2 off, 5 on 1 off, etc... to see the outcomes, and hear how people responded both mentally and physically to them.
    I agree, as well as far more test subjects. You'd think with the obesity epidemic in the states, it wouldn't be that hard to get funding. On the plus side, these study designers had some strong internal logic to the design. The adaptive process has maxed out around 2-3 weeks (based on past research) so going longer means your rate of weight loss is going to be slowed considerably. The next key question is recovery of REE, how long does it take and how is that time period altered by time spent in calorie restriction? I think there's likely data out there, I'll just have to dig to find it.

    Originally Posted by brock8282 View Post
    Just want to make a few corrections to the original post.
    intermittent group lost 5 KILOS more, so closer to 11 pounds and it was mostly fat mass lost, not fat free mass.
    Thanks! I probably should refrain from posting anything lengthy while working my shift, too many distractions!

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