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  1. #1
    Elite PFM's Avatar
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    Big Government fans rejoice!

    The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is a proposed law in the United States which would allow for the sharing of Internet traffic information between the U.S. government and technology and manufacturing companies. The stated aim of the bill is to help the U.S government investigate cyber threats and ensure the security of networks against cyberattacks.[1]

    The legislation was introduced on November 30, 2011 by U.S. Representative Michael Rogers (R-MI) and 111 co-sponsors.[2][3] It was passed in the House of Representatives on April 26, 2012, but was not passed by the U.S. Senate.[4] President Obama's advisers have argued that the bill lacks confidentiality and civil liberties safeguards and they advised him to veto it.[5] In February 2013 the House reintroduced the bill [6] and passed it on April 18, 2013.[7]

    CISPA has been criticized by advocates of Internet privacy and civil liberties, such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Civil Liberties Union, Fight for the Future, and Avaaz.org, as well as various conservative and libertarian groups including the Competitive Enterprise Institute, TechFreedom, FreedomWorks, Americans for Limited Government, Liberty Coalition, and the American Conservative Union. Those groups argue CISPA contains too few limits on how and when the government may monitor a private individual’s Internet browsing information. Additionally, they fear that such new powers could be used to spy on the general public rather than to pursue malicious hackers.[8][9] CISPA had garnered favor from corporations and lobbying groups such as Microsoft, Facebook, AT&T, IBM, Apple and the United States Chamber of Commerce, which look on it as a simple and effective means of sharing important cyber threat information with the government.[10]

    Some critics saw CISPA as a second attempt at strengthening digital piracy laws after the Stop Online Piracy Act met huge opposition.[11] Intellectual property theft was initially listed in the bill as a possible cause for sharing Web traffic information with the government, though it was removed in subsequent drafts.[12]

    Content

    CISPA is an amendment to the National Security Act of 1947, which does not currently contain provisions pertaining to cybercrime. It adds provisions to the Act describing cyber threat intelligence as "information in the possession of an element of the intelligence community directly pertaining to a vulnerability of, or threat to, a system or network of a government or private entity, including information pertaining to the protection of a system or network from either 'efforts to degrade, disrupt, or destroy such system or network'; or 'theft or misappropriation of private or government information, intellectual property, or personally identifiable information.'"[13] In addition, CISPA requires the Director of National Intelligence to establish procedures to allow intelligence community elements to share cyber threat intelligence with private-sector entities and encourage the sharing of such intelligence.[14]

    In an April 16th, 2012, press release, the House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence announced the approval of several amendments to CISPA, including the addition of a new provision "to permit federal lawsuits against the government for any violation of restrictions placed on the government’s use of voluntarily shared information, including the important privacy and civil liberties protections contained in the bill," the inclusion of an anti-tasking provision to "explicitly prohibit the government from conditioning its sharing of cyber threat intelligence on the sharing of private sector information with the government," and the prevention of the government from using the information for "any other lawful purpose unless the government already has a significant cybersecurity or national security purpose in using the information." Relevant provisions were also clarified to "focus on the fact that the bill is designed to protect against unauthorized access to networks or systems, including unauthorized access aimed at stealing private or government information." [15] In addition, already collected cyberthreat data can also be used to investigate "the imminent threat of bodily harm to an individual" or "the exploitation of a minor," bringing the bill into line with existing law codified by the PATRIOT Act and the PROTECT Our Children Act in which these two conditions already allow for protected entities to share data voluntarily with the United States government, law enforcement agencies, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

    [edit]Recent developments

    Bill sponsors Mike Rogers and Dutch Ruppersberger, the chairman and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, respectively, said on April 25, 2012 that the Obama administration's opposition is mostly based on the lack of critical infrastructure regulation, something outside of the jurisdiction of the Intelligence committee; they have also since introduced a package of amendments to the legislation that, "address nearly every single one of the criticisms leveled by the Administration, particularly those regarding privacy and civil liberties of Americans."[16]

    Due to the opposition the bill has experienced, the co-sponsors are planning to amend the bill to address many of the concerns of its opponents — including limiting its scope to a narrower definition of cyber-threats, and stating that the "theft of intellectual property" refers to the theft of research and development. In addition, there will now be penalties if private companies or the government uses data from CISPA for purposes "unrelated to cyberthreats." [17][18]

    However, Sharan Bradford Franklin, of the Constitution Project states, "Although we appreciate the Intelligence Committee's efforts to improve the bill and willingness to engage in a dialogue with privacy advocates, the changes in its most current draft do not come close to addressing the civil liberties threats posed by the bill, and some of the proposals would actually make CISPA worse. Therefore, Congress should not pass CISPA."[19]

    Rainey Reitman, of the Electronic Frontier Foundation states, "To date, the authors of the bill have been unresponsive to these criticisms, offering amendments that are largely cosmetic. Dismissing the grave concerns about how this bill could undermine the core privacy rights of everyday Internet users, Rep. Mike Rogers characterized the growing protests against CISPA as 'turbulence' and vowed to push for a floor vote without radical changes."[20]

    Kendall Burman of the Center for Democracy and Technology states, "The authors of CISPA have made some positive changes recently. Unfortunately, none of the changes gets to the heart of the privacy concerns that Internet users and advocacy groups have expressed."[21]

    In April 2012, the Office of Management and Budget of the Executive Office of the President of the United States released a statement strongly opposing the current bill and recommending to veto it.[22]

    On April 26, 2012, the House of Representatives passed CISPA.

    On February 13, 2013, United States Representative Mike Rogers reintroduced the CISPA bill in the 113th Congress as H.R. 624.[6]

    On April 18, 2013, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 624.[7]

    House voting counts
    House vote on April 26, 2012 passing CISPA
    Affiliation Yes votes No votes Did not vote
    Democratic 42 140 8
    Republican 206 28 7
    Total 248 168 15
    A full list can be seen at the House.gov site.[23]

    House vote on April 18, 2013 passing CISPA
    Affiliation Yes votes No votes Did not vote
    Democratic 92 98 11
    Republican 196 29 6
    Total 288 127 17
    A full list can be seen at the House.gov site.[24]

    [edit]Supporters

    CISPA is supported by several trade groups containing more than eight hundred private companies, including the Business Software Alliance, CTIA – The Wireless Association, Information Technology Industry Council, Internet Security Alliance, National Cable & Telecommunications Association, National Defense Industrial Association, TechAmerica and United States Chamber of Commerce, in addition to individual major telecommunications and information technology companies like AT&T, IBM, Intel, Oracle Corporation, Symantec, and Verizon.[25][26] Google has not taken a public position on the bill [27] but has shown previous support for it, and now says they support the idea but believe the bill needs some work.[28]

    [edit]Opposition

    Former U.S. Representative Ron Paul (R-TX) has publicly opposed the bill calling it "Big Brother writ large."[29][30][31][32]
    36 groups currently oppose CISPA[33] with an addition of 6 groups as of April 21.[34] The Electronic Frontier Foundation lists a growing list of opposition [35] as well as a list of security experts, academics, and engineers in opposition of the bill.[36] They also published the statement Don’t Let Congress Use "Cybersecurity" Fears to Erode Digital Rights.[37]
    Opposition to CISPA includes more than 762,000 online petitioners who have signed global civic organization Avaaz.org's petition to members of the US Congress entitled "Save the Internet from the US".[38] Avaaz also has a petition to Facebook, Microsoft, and IBM entitled "The end of Internet privacy", signed by more than 730,000 people.[39]
    The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) published a statement titled "Cybersecurity's 7-Step Plan for Internet Freedom". The CDT openly opposes the Mike Rogers bill based on these 7-step criteria.[40] The CDT has also openly supported a competing bill in the house sponsored by U.S. Representative Dan Lungren (R-CA)[41] that has yet to be reported by the committee.[42]
    The Constitution Project (TCP) "believes cybersecurity legislation currently pending before Congress possess major risks to civil liberties that must be addressed before any bill is enacted into law." [43]
    The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has also issued a statement opposing the bill stating, "The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act would create a cybersecurity exception to all privacy laws and allow companies to share the private and personal data they hold on their American customers with the government for cybersecurity purposes." As the statement continues, "Beyond the potential for massive data collection authorization, the bill would provide no meaningful oversight of, or accountability for, the use of these new information-sharing authorities."[44]
    The Sunlight Foundation states, "The new cybersecurity bill, CISPA, or HR 3523, is terrible on transparency. The bill proposes broad new information collection and sharing powers (which many other organizations are covering at length). Even as the bill proposes those powers, it proposes to limit public oversight of this work."[45]
    Cenk Uygur, from Current TV, opposed the bill and did a piece where he highlights one of Mike Rogers' speech about the bill to the business community. He also summarized the bill to his audience.[46]
    Demand Progress opposes CISPA, stating "The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, would obliterate any semblance of online privacy in the United States." [47]
    Competitive Enterprise Institute joins with TechFreedom, FreedomWorks, Americans for Limited Government, Liberty Coalition, Al Cardenas, and American Conservative Union to write a letter to Congress.[48] Competitive Enterprise Institute states, "Despite the bill's noble intentions, however, it risks unduly expanding federal power, undermining freedom of contract, and harming U.S. competitiveness in the technology sector." The Competitive Enterprise Institute lists 6 problems within the bill itself and how to fix those problems.[34]
    Reporters Without Borders states, "Reporters Without Borders is deeply concerned with the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), the cyber security bill now before the US Congress. In the name of the war on cyber crime, it would allow the government and private companies to deploy draconian measures to monitor, even censor, the Web. It might even be used to close down sites that publish classified files or information."[49]
    testPAC opposes CISPA stating "CISPA would effectively take the door off the hinge of every household in America, but lacks the tools necessary to distinguish whether there is a criminal hiding in the attic. Why surrender the core of our privacy for the sake of corporate and governmental convenience?"[50]
    Mozilla, the makers of the Firefox Web-Browser, opposes CISPA stating, "While we wholeheartedly support a more secure Internet, CISPA has a broad and alarming reach that goes far beyond Internet security."[51]
    The Association of Computing Machinery believes that "More effective information sharing in support of cybersecurity is a laudable goal, but CISPA is seriously flawed in its approach to PII. Better approaches to information sharing are certainly possible if privacy goals are also considered."[52]
    IGDA, the International Game Developers Association is against this bill, urging Congress and the President to reject it saying, in part, "The version of CISPA which just emerged from the House Intelligence Committee does not address the privacy failings in the previous version, which the White House wisely rejected. The bill still retains its dangerously over-broad language, still lacks civilian control, still lacks judicial oversight, and still lacks clear limits on government monitoring of our Internet browsing information. The House should vote against it." [53]
    Russia Today, a Russian state-owned broadcast medium, was one of the first organizations to oppose CISPA, and was the first known source to use the phrase "Worse than SOPA".[54]
    [edit]Week of Action
    Dubbed the "Stop Cyber Spying Week", starting on April 16, 2012, many civil liberties groups and advocates raised the awareness of CISPA (through a Twitter campaign with the hash-tags #CISPA and #CongressTMI,) including, but not limited to, the Constitution Project, American Civil Liberties Union, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Center for Democracy and Technology, Demand Progress, Fight for the Future, Free Press, Reporters Without Borders, Sunlight Foundation, and TechFreedom.[55][56][57][58][59]

    [edit]Prior Attempts for U.S. Cybersecurity Bills

    Since legislation must pass the House and the Senate within the same Congress, anything introduced during the 112th or earlier Congresses has to pass both chambers again.

    [edit]Senate
    S. 2151 (Secure IT), introduced by Senator John McCain (R-AZ) on March 1, 2012.[60]

    S. 2105 (Cybersecurity Act), reported by committee on February 15, 2012. Sponsored by Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT). [61] Failing to gain enough support for passage, the bill, entitled "Cybersecurity Act of 2012", was reintroduced on July 19, 2012 in a revised form which omitted federal imposition of security standards on ip providers, as well as including stronger privacy and civil liberties protections.[62]

    [edit]House of Representatives
    H.R. 3674 (Precise Act), reported by committee April 18, 2012 by U.S. Representative Dan Lungren (R-CA).[63] The bill has recently changed as "Lungren dropped many of the critical infrastructure and DHS provisions" due to the house.[64] The bill will be debated alongside CISPA and H.R. 4257 (Federal Information Security Amendment Act of 2012) depending on House Speaker Boehner.

    H.R. 4257 Federal Information Security Amendment Act of 2012, reported by committee April 18, 2012 [65] by U.S. Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA).


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_I...Protection_Act
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  2. #2
    Elite FreeBirdSam's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    When will "we the people" start getting a say so in this? I'm ****ing tired of bills being passed that infringe on our rights, without the option for citizens to even vote on them.


    This country has hit rock bottom and I hate to think about what it will be like for my kid's in the years following.

  3. #3
    Traptheend AndroSport's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    If this is the same thing I've been reading about it gives the big corporations the ability to basically enforce federal laws on the public... Using the government as their henchmen. I don't know if there is a high probability it will pass but they will keep trying until they get it through in one form or another. Plus it gives government more information than they should have.

    I didn't have time to read it all but I think this is the same one.

  4. #4
    Elite PFM's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    Originally Posted by samcooke View Post
    When will "we the people" start getting a say so in this? I'm ****ing tired of bills being passed that infringe on our rights, without the option for citizens to even vote on them.


    This country has hit rock bottom and I hate to think about what it will be like for my kid's in the years following.
    If it was a Republican President the mainstream media would be all over everything he does. This entire Administration has a free pass.
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    Elite PillarofBalance's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    Originally Posted by samcooke View Post
    When will "we the people" start getting a say so in this? I'm ****ing tired of bills being passed that infringe on our rights, without the option for citizens to even vote on them.


    This country has hit rock bottom and I hate to think about what it will be like for my kid's in the years following.
    Its a Republic so the people you elect are the people who are voting for this shit. In most congressional polls, you'll see people's opinion of Congress is always poor. Right now its at an 8% approval rating I believe. But if you ask the same person who doesn't approve of Congress' job, they usually like THEIR own Congressman's work. Which is why they keep getting re-elected.

    Term limits. I think its time.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member corvettels3's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    so this is another piece of legislation that the Republicans want? Is this not the party of limited government? this is nothing compared to the patriot act. please remind me who passed this act..

  7. #7
    Elite grind4it's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    Unfortunately, 51%+ of the people in this country don't care, are on the tit or too ****ing stupid to care. This is the new age. The people who have been elected are well aware of the fact that the vast majority (back to the 51%+) of the citezens are getting some thing from the current system, uneducated, or lazy/simple. They will continue to chip away our freedoms until we are a broken, brain dead mess that looks like a failing EU country........There is only one solution


    Originally Posted by samcooke View Post
    When will "we the people" start getting a say so in this? I'm ****ing tired of bills being passed that infringe on our rights, without the option for citizens to even vote on them.


    This country has hit rock bottom and I hate to think about what it will be like for my kid's in the years following.

  8. #8
    Elite bubbagump's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    Big brother is always watching. Its about to get worse.
    The country is covered with police cameras In the name of "safer streets" and "fighting terrorism". Between those cameras (which have facial recognition capability) and every app you download on your damn phone tracks your gps, There is no escape. We have data collection facilities across the country called fusion centers that do nothing but collect and interperit info on everyone in the country (gps, facial recognition,money transactions, etc) . They use the data to predict where you will go, what you will do and who you may be with, what you will buy, etc.
    The DHS has cost us BILLIONS AND BILLIONS and isnt worth a shit. Dont even get me started on TSA
    The biggest problem is the people in charge of counter terrorism think that means counter constitution. And the retards will say, Oh I dont mind giving up some freedom if it makes us safer. I will bet the little kids that get fondled by pedo TSA douchebags dont feel very safe. I dont feel very safe When I read about warrantless searches and confiscations of private property (BOston and Katrina, etc.) But hey its all in the name of safety. Problem is its safety for the ****ers with the badge, not the people.

    Oh, and dont forget the drones.



  9. #9
    Veteran BigGameHunter's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    Originally Posted by PillarofBalance View Post
    Its a Republic so the people you elect are the people who are voting for this shit. In most congressional polls, you'll see people's opinion of Congress is always poor. Right now its at an 8% approval rating I believe. But if you ask the same person who doesn't approve of Congress' job, they usually like THEIR own Congressman's work. Which is why they keep getting re-elected.

    Term limits. I think its time.
    Dont just stop there. Make them independent contractors just like the rest of the free market. If you dont produce or fail at something the Congressman pays. I think they wouldnt be as inclined to make such a party of their trip to DC if they were the ones funding it.

    I also dont think that they should be given immunity from bad decisions they make or issues they ignore. Such as Fanny Mae and Freddy Mac and the fall out from it. Let John Kerry and McCain pay out the ass when their bad decisions bite Americans in the rear.

  10. #10
    Member HammerT1's Avatar
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    Re: Big Government fans rejoice!

    I agree!!!!
    But instead they are going to allow em to profit off making bad decisions rather then punishing them. They are only in it for themselves! If your not related, connected or big business who can throw a ton of cash, clout etc they don't give a rats ass about the working man or his rights.
    I actually called my local ass clowns about issues I was having with my injury and having to fight to get the proper medical care. One had the nerve to admit he knew it was a major problem but no one including himself was willing to address the issue. He thanked me for my sacrafice, reminded me he was up for re election and to vote for him because at least he cared unlike his competition! Glad we werent in a room together!!

    I hate seeing what they are doing to our rights.

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