Hmb

Jada

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does this product have any use in Bodybuilding truly? have any one of u that used this product notice some positive results. i was always told its a bull shit product that its just out there to take ur money.
 

gymrat827

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the leucine metabolite..... dont waste your time bro.
 

Times Roman

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I looked into it once and declined taking it:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/1


Studies which do not support the Efficacy of HMB supplementation

A number of studies conflict with research that supports the efficacy of HMB supplementation. The following section will analyze these studies.

Kreider et al. [64] used 40 experienced (M = 5 y) resistance trained athletes who averaged 7 hours of training per week for 28 days, while supplementing with 0, 3, or 6 g of HMB daily. Participants were not monitored, but instead, were instructed to maintain their normal training programs during the experiment and record their training volume before and after the experiment in a log. Consistent with this, no differences were found in training volume performed before and after supplementation with HMB; while training intensity was not reported. Results showed no significant decrease in markers of muscle damage, fat mass, increased LBM or 1 RM performance in any of the lifts measured in the placebo or HMB supplemented conditions.

Slater et al. [65] had experienced resistance trained males (M = 2 y) consume 3 g of HMB or a placebo for 6 weeks while performing 2–3 sessions weekly of compound movements (e.g. leg press, chins, bench press), for a total of 24–32 sets, at a training intensity of 4–6 repetitions. The training intervention significantly increased lean body mass and total strength gains, but did not increase any of the individual lifts. HMB supplementation had no significant effect on LBM or strength or biochemical markers of muscle damage.

Paddon-Jones et al. [66] examined the effects of HMB on symptoms of muscle damage following a bout of eccentric exercise. Participants were non-resistance trained males, who consumed HMB or a placebo, 6 days prior to and after a bout of 24 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Muscle soreness was measured using a 10 point visual analogue scale, with a response range from no soreness to extreme soreness. Arm girth was measured with a metal tape measure, and muscle torque was also measured at 15 minutes and 1, 2, 3, 7, and 10 days post exercise. The exercise bout significantly (p < .05) increased muscle soreness, peaking at a score of 7; but there was no significant difference between conditions in muscle soreness, ROM, or elbow flexor strength. In a similar experiment, Jennifer et al. [67] found no significant difference in ROM or DOMS from HMB supplementation.

O'Connor and Crowe [20] investigated the effects of HMB or HMB and creatine supplementation in elite, male rugby players. Testing involved a multistage fitness test to determine aerobic power and a 60 second maximal cycle test to determine anaerobic capacity. No significant differences were showed in either condition for any of the measures taken.

Jack et al. [68] examined the effects of daily HMB supplementation on muscular strength (bench press, squats, and power cleans) and body composition (body weight and body fat) among elite collegiate football players who trained 20 hours per week for 4 weeks. Results found no significant benefits from HMB in bench press, squats, or power clean performance, and no significant changes in body composition. The lack of improvement overall from this program lead the authors to conclude that, "...subjects may have been over trained. The volume of exercise in this study was higher than most other HMB-supplementation studies. Although HMB may be most effective when increasing training volume or intensity, the extremely high total training load may have attenuated the potential effectiveness of HMB to reduce muscle damage or protein breakdown."

Similar to the aforementioned experiment, Hoffman et al. [69] investigated the effects of HMB on power performance (using the Wingate anaerobic power test), indices of muscle damage, and stress in 26 collegiate football players, during a 10-day training camp. Results found no significant differences among conditions in markers of stress (testosterone/cortisol ratio) and markers of muscle damage (myoglobin and CK); finally, there was no significant increase in performance in either condition pre to post test.

Kreider et al. [70] examined the effects of 3 grams of HMB on Division 1-A College Football players over 4 weeks of training. Training was supervised, and consisted of 5 hours per week of resistance training with movements such as bench press, shoulder press, and squats. Lifts were prescribed at 1–3 sets, 2–8 reps, at 60–90% intensities. Football sprints and agility drills were also performed 3 hours per week. Training significantly (p < .05) increased total body mass, LBM, biochemical markers of muscle damage, and decreased body fat percentage; however, there were no significant differences between conditions in any of these variables. Lastly, there was no significant difference between conditions in combined lifting volume, or repetitive sprint performance.

Possible explanations for conflicting results

It is critical to analyze possible explanations for conflicting results. To begin, in practically any investigation, the possibility of obtaining contradictory results is high, based on the inherent noise (variability) found across human participants [71]. The effects of variability in humans on behavioral measures was first quantitatively analyzed by Clark Hull in the 1940s [72]. Hull suggested that performance was determined by seven components such as internal drive states (e.g., motivation) that were variable in nature. Since Hull, numerous studies have confirmed that results in human performance are not only affected by physiological states, which are the primary target of HMB, but also through numerous other variables including: the participant's social milieu (e.g., social facilitation/debilitation) [73], motivations (intrinsic and extrinsic) [74], self-confidence [73], and current emotive states [75]. According to Schmidt and Lee [71], the most effective way to 'tease' out variable behavior is through obtaining adequate sample sizes. Unfortunately, it is often difficult for scientists to obtain large samples [76], as indicated in a number of studies conducted on HMB in which sample sizes are comprised of 8 or fewer participants [32,42,43,67], while the results obtained are generalized to millions of people worldwide. Scientists are also often limited to biased sampling, such as sampling by availability [77,78] and convenience [76]. Thus, contradictory studies should not be surprising in biological research–rather, they should be expected.

A number of qualitative and quantitative solutions exist to deal with this problem. Qualitatively, comprehensive reviews are able to synthesize numerous studies in order to find trends in the literature. Quantitatively the effect sizes from hundreds of subjects across several studies can be combined.

Other problems that occur lie in the validity of the testing conditions. As will be discussed, certain tests may not serve as a valid means of measuring what HMB supplementation is purported to effect. A second problem that stems from invalid measurements is that the conclusions drawn from them may also be invalid. The following section details specific examples of methodological problems, which may partly explain contradictory results found in HMB-related literature.
 

Mind2muscle

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It sounds like an interesting product but I believe for it to be effective the cost would outweigh the positives.
 

gymrat827

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on paper its great. but real world results are not what they are on paper.

pass on it bro
 

Jada

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Thanks my bros, I had a feeling the product doesn't live to the hype
 

RowdyBrad

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I used to like the getagen that had the creatine and hmb in it.

Problem with the hmb is it costs enough that to take the needed doses would get crazy.
 

biggerben692000

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Victor Conte touted HMB as a great muscle building supplement. I bought a bottle back in the early 90's from GNC. The only thing it did was give me some painful boils near one armpit. No positive results.
 

pirovoliko

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Cant say Ive ever heard of any real positives justifying it J
 
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