The Healing benefits of Thymosin Beta-4 (TB-500 aka Tb4)

Times Roman

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Mates,

I have recently completed a six week course of TB500, and am happy to report that my shoulder pain and my tendonitis are in full remission thanks to this wonderful peptide. It is available on the pep market. You can PM me if you want to know where i get mine. Typical dose is 15mg over six weeks, with weekly SubQ injections, as follows:

week/dose
1 - 5mg
2 thru 6 - 2.5mg

Follow these links for some interesting reading:

http://www.columbiasurgery.org/news/research/2006_wound_healing.html

http://markets.financialcontent.com...44/Breakthrough_Peptide_Provides_Winning_Edge

I think this thread would be a great vehicle to discuss the various aspects of TB500, how to take, injury repair, and maybe just to bounce ideas off one another.

What say the brother?
 

gymrat827

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you ll see im the peptide guy around these parts. Ive never tried it, but i have hernia, a really messed up lower back and shoulders that snap, crackle, pop so i may be in order to give this a go.


most of my stuff needs to be taken care of by going under the knife but i bet this would at least help.
 

Times Roman

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you ll see im the peptide guy around these parts. Ive never tried it, but i have hernia, a really messed up lower back and shoulders that snap, crackle, pop so i may be in order to give this a go.


most of my stuff needs to be taken care of by going under the knife but i bet this would at least help.

it's definately NOT a miracle cure. I would highly recommend it Post surgery, like right after going under the knife, as soon as you get home. You may have to increase the dose/duration, maybe not.

I'm a big fan of peps too. Looks like we're in good company! ;)
 

SAD

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I used to be all about peptides and still like the idea of them, but since dedicating myself purely to powerlifting, I haven't been able to justify needing peptides for anything. This seems like a promising peptide for those nagging stresses that can be rested after a meet, so I'm definitely intrigued.

Anything else promising for a pure strength athlete? I couldn't care less about gaining muscle size, but if there is a peptide out there that increases the strength of muscular contractions or something else along those lines, I'll be a guinea pig.
 

gymrat827

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Anything else promising for a pure strength athlete? I couldn't care less about gaining muscle size, but if there is a peptide out there that increases the strength of muscular contractions or something else along those lines, I'll be a guinea pig.

igf lr3 / PEG mgf combo will prolly be best, it wont give strength gains like a aas type compound but you will be adding new cells at a pretty high rate. growth occurs much faster.


the peg mgf keeps it active for 20hrs or so. It creates more stem sites. Than the LR3 grows them from stem sites to new cells. this doesnt happen overnight, but those who give the stack a good 8-10wk run will see what im talking about.
 

Mind2muscle

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you ll see im the peptide guy around these parts. Ive never tried it, but i have hernia, a really messed up lower back and shoulders that snap, crackle, pop so i may be in order to give this a go.


most of my stuff needs to be taken care of by going under the knife but i bet this would at least help.
\

I'm not sure what the details are of your back injury GymRat but check out the Mckenzie Exercises. It is a science based set of exercises specifically for back pain. There is also a set for cervical/neck pain. I had to utilize the neck exercises and within a matter of a couple of weeks my neck felt 100%. Like I said though I dont know your specifics but check em out anyways.
 

gymrat827

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i played hockey from 6-18 yrs old. im not even sure whats wrong. I went to a ortho twice....both were 3-5yrs back but both said we can cut you up or just live with it.


and thats not the hernia..... i still have that in my lower left ab area.


My shoulders snap, crackle, pop. i rotate them and its terrible. I bench almost the same amount as i can DB press. (295 and 110's)

but im just doing what i do. fuck the knife, me and my tiny vials of special stuff are all i need. <:p
 

Four1Thr33

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What kinda sholder injury did u have... Mine is very sharp pain when lifting up. Not really a bench but def pain when sholder pressing. Not sure if I should try this or stop lifting
 

gymrat827

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3-5 yrs back i really had to take it easy with shoulders/chest. Im not really sure what i did. And i think it was a on going thing that was never treated or looked at while i was younger.

if you are getting pain for a certain type of movement id stop it quickly.... or reduce the weight down to pretty much nothing.
 

Four1Thr33

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Ya I dropped weight and have been trying to baby it on sholder day... But it has been bothering me for a wile and changed from dull pain to sharp
Have a dr apt in 18 days.
 

Four1Thr33

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I'm guessing stop any sholder lifting .... It's an odd feeling I normally just push threw
 

Times Roman

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What kinda sholder injury did u have... Mine is very sharp pain when lifting up. Not really a bench but def pain when sholder pressing. Not sure if I should try this or stop lifting

My shoulder pain was rotator cuff related and is very typical for those that lift. My son's was even worse whereby he could not do a single BP or MP. Six weeks later he's going heavy again, same as me.

I'm telling you guys, for under $100 and six week protocol, it is definately worth investigating.

PM me if you want to know where I get mine......
 

Supra

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HGH all the way, I never would mess around with untested shit like that.
 

Supra

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Where are the long term studies shown or clinical testing showing short and long term risks of taking it?
 

Times Roman

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Where are the long term studies shown or clinical testing showing short and long term risks of taking it?

this study suggests that administered post heart attack, there are significant improvements to heart health:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v474/n7353/full/nature10188.html

A significant bottleneck in cardiovascular regenerative medicine is the identification of a viable source of stem/progenitor cells that could contribute new muscle after ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction1. A therapeutic ideal—relative to cell transplantation—would be to stimulate a resident source, thus avoiding the caveats of limited graft survival, restricted homing to the site of injury and host immune rejection. Here we demonstrate in mice that the adult heart contains a resident stem or progenitor cell population, which has the potential to contribute bona fide terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. We reveal a novel genetic label of the activated adult progenitors via re-expression of a key embryonic epicardial gene, Wilm’s tumour 1 (Wt1), through priming by thymosin β4, a peptide previously shown to restore vascular potential to adult epicardium-derived progenitor cells2 with injury. Cumulative evidence indicates an epicardial origin of the progenitor population, and embryonic reprogramming results in the mobilization of this population and concomitant differentiation to give rise to de novo cardiomyocytes. Cell transplantation confirmed a progenitor source and chromosome painting of labelled donor cells revealed transdifferentiation to a myocyte fate in the absence of cell fusion. Derived cardiomyocytes are shown here to structurally and functionally integrate with resident muscle; as such, stimulation of this adult progenitor pool represents a significant step towards resident-cell-based therapy in human ischaemic heart disease.
 

Times Roman

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Where are the long term studies shown or clinical testing showing short and long term risks of taking it?

Here is something you can watch if you are so inclined:

[video]A significant bottleneck in cardiovascular regenerative medicine is the identification of a viable source of stem/progenitor cells that could contribute new muscle after ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction1. A therapeutic ideal—relative to cell transplantation—would be to stimulate a resident source, thus avoiding the caveats of limited graft survival, restricted homing to the site of injury and host immune rejection. Here we demonstrate in mice that the adult heart contains a resident stem or progenitor cell population, which has the potential to contribute bona fide terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. We reveal a novel genetic label of the activated adult progenitors via re-expression of a key embryonic epicardial gene, Wilm’s tumour 1 (Wt1), through priming by thymosin β4, a peptide previously shown to restore vascular potential to adult epicardium-derived progenitor cells2 with injury. Cumulative evidence indicates an epicardial origin of the progenitor population, and embryonic reprogramming results in the mobilization of this population and concomitant differentiation to give rise to de novo cardiomyocytes. Cell transplantation confirmed a progenitor source and chromosome painting of labelled donor cells revealed transdifferentiation to a myocyte fate in the absence of cell fusion. Derived cardiomyocytes are shown here to structurally and functionally integrate with resident muscle; as such, stimulation of this adult progenitor pool represents a significant step towards resident-cell-based therapy in human ischaemic heart disease.[/video]
 

Times Roman

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Where are the long term studies shown or clinical testing showing short and long term risks of taking it?

Here is more to read if you care to:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...ionid=C8C17D5E9687511263A5602A0E02FE22.d01t02

Published studies have described a number of physiological properties and cellular functions of thymosin β4 (Tβ4), the major G-actin-sequestering molecule in mammalian cells. Those activities include the promotion of cell migration, blood vessel formation, cell survival, stem cell differentiation, the modulation of cytokines, chemokines, and specific proteases, the upregulation of matrix molecules and gene expression, and the downregulation of a major nuclear transcription factor. Such properties have provided the scientific rationale for a number of ongoing and planned dermal, corneal, cardiac clinical trials evaluating the tissue protective, regenerative and repair potential of Tβ4, and direction for future clinical applications in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system, lung inflammatory disease, and sepsis. A special emphasis is placed on the development of Tβ4 in the treatment of patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction in combination with percutaneous coronary intervention.
 
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